Charles Bieneman

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Charles Bieneman is a member of the firm. Prior to forming Bejin Bieneman PLC, Charlie was a partner in a Michigan intellectual property firm. Previously, he was a patent examiner with the U.S. Patent and Trademark office, where he examined claimed inventions in the areas of computer software, databases, and the World Wide Web.  He also held management positions with two computer software companies and has significant real world experience as a software developer, consultant, and project manager. Charlie gained experience as an attorney with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Washington, D.C. office of a national law firm. Charlie has served as an adjunct professor of Computer Law at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School.

Charlie was 2011-2012 Chair of the State Bar of Michigan Information Technology Law Section.

While at the University of Michigan Law School he was a Note Editor of Michigan Law Review, 1991-1992, and is the author of “Note, Legal Interpretation and a Constitutional Case: Home Building & Loan Association v. Blaisdell, 90 Mich. L. Rev. 2534, 1990.”

Outside of the office, Charlie’s interests include cooking, fine wine, and listening to classical music.

Charlie blogs about software and intellectual property issues at The Software Intellectual Property Report (http://swipreport.com).

Contact

313.244.0676
bieneman@b2iplaw.com

Education

University of Michigan
J.D. cum laude (1992)
Editor, Michigan Law Review (1989)

University of Maryland
B.S. in Computer Science (1999)

St. John’s College in Santa Fe
Bachelor of Arts (1989)

Admitted

State Bar of Michigan
State Bar of Maryland
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
U.S. District Courts for the Eastern and Western Districts of Michigan
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

Organizations & Affiliations

American Intellectual Property Law Association
Michigan Intellectual Property Law Association
Information Technology Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan
State Bar of Michigan
American Bar Association

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